Latin America in the Global Cybersecurity Index 2020

Despite there still several pending tasks in Latin America related to cybersecurity, most Latin American countries were able to scale positions in the Global Cybersecurity Index 2020.

Several countries in Latin America reached progress in the Global Cybersecurity Index, a report backed by International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Brazil, Mexico, Uruguay, the Dominican Republic, and Chile were the best performers in the region.

Despite there still several pending tasks in Latin America related to cybersecurity, most Latin American countries were able to scale positions in the index.

Brazil, Latin American leader in Cybersecurity

The best-ranked Latin American country was Brazil, which ranks 18th in the index, followed by Mexico, Uruguay, the Dominican Republic, and Chile. By climbing 53 positions in the ranking, the country also became the third-best located in America, only behind the United States and Canada.

Mexico went from position 63 in 2018 to position 52 in the Global Cybersecurity Index 2020 of the ITU. The country’s rating was 81.68 points and at the continental level, it remains fourth in cybersecurity with the United States and Canada leading again, although there is a change in third place, where Uruguay took it in 2018 and last year. Brazil rose to this position.

The Union’s analysis places Mexico as a developing country. It stands out that the indicator that has been strong in cybersecurity are cooperation measures with a score of 17.34 out of a possible 20, despite obtaining the best rating in technical measures with 17.90.

As an area of ​​potential growth, the international organization mentions regulatory measures with Mexico reaching its lowest rating with 14.70 points.

Chile is today in position 74 of the world ranking, having found itself in the previous list at position 83. At the same time, Chile rose from position nine in the last GCI to seven.

GCI in the world

Globally, the United States obtained the best result with 100 points, followed by the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, Estonia, Korea, Singapore, and Spain.

The worst-ranked countries were Honduras, Djibouti, Burundi, Eritrea, Equatorial Guinea, and North Korea.

Micronesia, the Vatican, and Yemen are placed at the bottom of the index because they did not provide information.

Methodology

This index collects 82 questions on the cybersecurity commitments of the member states in five pillars: legal, technical, organizational, capacity building and cooperation measures.

1. Legal measures:

Measurement of the maturity of laws and regulations on cybercrime and cybersecurity.

This pillar evaluates issues such as: that the countries evaluated have some type of legislation on cybersecurity, data protection regulations and regulations on critical infrastructures.

2. Technical measures:

Measurement of the application of technical capacities through national and sectoral organizations.

This pillar evaluates issues such as: that the evaluated countries have active CSIRTs, participate in a regional CSIRT and that they have notification mechanisms for the protection of children online.

3. Organizational measures

Measurement of national strategies and organizations that apply cybersecurity.

This pillar evaluates issues such as: that the countries evaluated have national cybersecurity strategies, cybersecurity agencies, strategies, and initiatives for the protection of children online.

4. Capacity development measures

Measurement of awareness campaigns, training, education, and incentives for the development of cybersecurity capacities.

This pillar evaluates issues such as: that the evaluated countries carry out cybersecurity awareness initiatives, that they have R&D programs in cybersecurity, and that they declare that they have national cybersecurity industries.

5. Cooperation measures

Measurement of collaboration between agencies, companies, and countries.

This pillar evaluates issues such as: that the evaluated countries participate in public-private cybersecurity partnerships, that they have bilateral cybersecurity agreements and multilateral cybersecurity agreements.

Further reading